唐顿庄园第一季第一集_3

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2013-4-12 14:10

唐顿庄园第一季第一集_3

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唐顿庄园第一季第一集_3

ACT THREE

[INT. KITCHENS - DAY]
MRS PATMORE
Thomas, take that up.
[Daisy moves to help him.]
MRS PATMORE
Easy, Daisy, he's a grown man! I suppose he can lift a meat pie.
[Daisy smiles brightly at Thomas as he exits with the tray.]
MRS PATMORE
Now, put that apple tart in the lower oven.
[Daisy complies.]
MRS PATMORE
Oh, and take that away. Mr Lynch shouldn't have left it there.
DAISY
What is it?
MRS PATMORE
Salt of sorrel. I asked him for some to clean the brass pots. So, put it somewhere careful; it's poison.
DAISY
Seems like a lot of food when you think they're all in mourning.
MRS PATMORE
Nothing makes you hungrier or more tired than grief.

[Daisy gazes after Thomas with a smitten smile as he takes up the next dish.]
MRS PATMORE
When my sister died, God rest her soul, I ate my way through four platefuls of sandwiches at one sitting and slept 'round the clock.
DAISY
Did it make you feel better?
MRS PATMORE
Not much, but it passed the time. Oh, my lord. What was this chopped egg suppose to be sprinkled on?
DAISY
Was it the chicken?
MRS PATMORE
It was. Take it upstairs now.
DAISY
I can't go in the dining room.
MRS PATMORE
I should think not! Find Thomas or William and tell them what to do. Oh, for heaven's sake, get a move on, girl, before they get back from church!
[Daisy grabs the bowl and rushes out.]

[EXT. CHURCHYARD - DAY]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Well, we've given them a memorial in London and a memorial here.
GEORGE MURRAY
I prefer memorials to funerals, they're less dispiriting.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
We could hardly have held a funeral without the bodies.
GEORGE MURRAY
I gather they're putting up a stone to mark those whose bodies were never found. In fact, I hear the Canadians are making quite a thing of the Titanic cemetery. I'm surprised at the number they found. You'd think the sea would've taken more of them.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
So, Murray, what have you to tell me about the lucky Mr Crawley? Nothing too terrible, I hope.
[Murray chuckles.]

GEORGE MURRAY
I've only made a few inquiries, but no, there's, er, not much to alarm you. Matthew Crawley is a solicitor based in Manchester.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Manchester?
GEORGE MURRAY
His special field is company law. His mother is alive and he lives with her, his father obviously is not; he was a doctor.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I know. It does seem odd that my third cousin should be a doctor.
GEORGE MURRAY
There are worse professions.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Indeed.

[INT. SERVANTS' CORRIDOR - DAY]
[William stops to wipe his brow and Daisy rushes up to him.]
DAISY
Do me a favour, this is supposed to be sprinkled on the chicken.
WILLIAM
Isn't there more to go up?
DAISY
Oh, please, it won't take a moment!
WILLIAM
All right, give it to me.

[EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY, GROUNDS - DAY]
[The mourners walk back to the house.]
GEORGE MURRAY
We ought to talk about the business of the entail. As you know, on your death the heir to the title inherits everything except for the sums set aside for your daughters and your widow.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Yes?
GEORGE MURRAY
Owing to the terms of her settlement, this will include the bulk of your wife's fortune.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM (sigh)
It has been our sole topic of conversation since the day the ship went down.
GEORGE MURRAY
Of course, it must seem horribly unjust to Lady Grantham, but that is how the law stands.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Is there really no way to detach her money from the estate? Even to me it seems absurd.
GEORGE MURRAY
Your father tied the knots pretty tight; I'd say it's unbreakable.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I see.
[Further back, Edith weeps into her handkerchief.]
LADY MARY
Really, Edith, do you have to put on such an exhibition?
LADY SYBIL
She's not.
LADY MARY
I was supposed to be engaged to him, for heaven's sake, not you, and I can control myself.
LADY EDITH
Then you should be ashamed.

[INT. KITCHENS - DAY]
MRS PATMORE
Oh, don't tell me you haven't sent up the egg yet!
[Daisy panics and rushes out with the bowl. She grabs Gwen in the corridor.]
DAISY
Oh, God! Help me! Please, God, help me!
GWEN
What on earth's the matter?
DAISY
Just run upstairs to the dining room and find William, I beg you!
GWEN
I can't do that now.
DAISY
You've got to. I'll be hanged if you don't.
GWEN
What?
WILLIAM
Daisy, is that you?

[William comes down the stairs with the bowl in his hand.]
WILLIAM
Is it the chicken in a sauce or the plain chicken with sliced oranges?
DAISY
Oh, thank you blessed and merciful Lord! Thank you!
[Daisy swaps the egg dish with the salt of sorrel that William's holding.]
DAISY
It's the chicken in the sauce. I'll never do anything simple again, I swear it, not till I die!
[Gwen stares after Daisy in confusion.]

[EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY, FRONT WALK - DAY]
[Cora meets the mourning party at the front door.]
CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Mr Murray, how lovely to see you. Do come in.
GEORGE MURRAY
You're very kind, Lady Grantham, but I must get back to London.
CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
But you'll stay for luncheon?
GEORGE MURRAY
Thank you, but no. I'll eat on the train. In fact, if you'd be so good as to ask for the motor to be brought 'round?
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Mm.

[Robert turns to Carson, who nods.]
CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
But didn't you want the afternoon to talk things through?
GEORGE MURRAY
I think we've said everything we have to say, haven't we, my lord?
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Oh, for the time being, yes. Thank you, Murray. You've given me a good deal to think about.
[Murray turns to leave and Mary leads her sisters towards the house.]
CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Mary, try to get everyone into the dining room. Edith, make sure old Lord Minturn sits down.

[INT. MR CARSON'S OFFICE - DAY]
[Someone knocks at the door as Carson decanters some wine.]
MR CARSON
Mm-hmm?
[Mrs Hughes enters.]
MRS HUGHES
They've all gone?
MR CARSON
They have, thank the Lord.
MRS HUGHES
What about the lawyer?
MR CARSON
Oh, he was the first away. Didn't even stay for the luncheon.
MRS HUGHES
I wish they'd make their minds up. Gwen's put clean sheets on the blue room bed. Now she'll just have to strip it again.
MR CARSON
Can't you leave it for the next guest?
MRS HUGHES
Well, only if you don't tell.

[Carson chuckles.]
MRS HUGHES
So...has it all been settled?
MR CARSON (sigh)
I don't know if anything's been settled. There's a fellow in Manchester with claims to the title, I gather, but it's all a long way from settled.
MRS HUGHES
You mustn't take it personally.
MR CARSON
Oh, I do take it personally, Mrs Hughes. I can't stand by and watch our family threatened with the loss of all they hold dear.
MRS HUGHES (chuckles)
They're not our family.
MR CARSON
Well, they're all the family I've got.
[Mrs Hughes is surprised and humbled by his sharp sincerity.]
MR CARSON
I beg your pardon.
MRS HUGHES
Do you...ever wish you'd...gone another way?

[Carson looks up sharply.]
MRS HUGHES
Worked in a shop or a factory? Had a wife and children?
MR CARSON
Do you?
MRS HUGHES
I don't know. Maybe. Sometimes.
[Someone knocks at the door.]
GWEN
William's laid tea in the library, but Her Ladyship hasn't come down.
MRS HUGHES
She'll be tired. Take a tray up to her bedroom.
[Gwen nods.]
MR CARSON
Is Thomas back?
GWEN
Not yet, Mr Carson.
[Mrs Hughes turns to Carson for an explanation.]
MR CARSON
He asked if he could run down the village, I didn't see why not.

[EXT. THE VILLAGE - DAY]
[Thomas exits a shop and walks down the street.]

[INT. LADY GRANTHAM'S BEDROOM - DAY]
[Gwen brings in a tea tray while O'Brien helps Cora dress. O'Brien waits for Gwen to leave.]
MISS O'BRIEN
It's iniquitous. They can't expect you to sit by silent as your fortune is stolen away.
CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Can't they?
MISS O'BRIEN
His Lordship'd never let it happen.
CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
How's Bates working out?
MISS O'BRIEN
Well, I don't like to say. Only, it seems unkind to criticize a man for an affliction, milady. And even if it means he can't do his job.

[INT. LIBRARY - DAY]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
How are you settling in?
MR BATES
Very well, I think. Unless Your Lordship feels differently.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
No complaints?
MR BATES
If I had any, I should take them to Mr Carson, milord, not you.
[Robert chuckles.]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
You're probably right. And the house hasn't worn you out with the endless stairs and everything?
MR BATES
I like the house, my lord, and I like it as a place to work.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
What happened?
MR BATES
Oh, it's only the old wound. After I left the army, I had a spot of bother and just when I got through that, about a year ago my knee started playing up. A bit of shrapnel got left in or something had moved, but it's fine. It's not a problem.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
And you'd let me know if you felt it was all too much for you?
MR BATES
I would. But it won't be.

[00:26:54, EXT. COURTYARD - DAY]
[Thomas returns while O'Brien is on her smoke break.]
SERVANT
Thomas.
MISS O'BRIEN
And where have you been?
THOMAS
In the village. Sent a telegram, if you must know.
MISS O'BRIEN
Oh, pardon me for living.
[She offers him a cigarette.]
MISS O'BRIEN
Well, Murray didn't stay long.
THOMAS
Does Her Ladyship know how they left it?
MISS O'BRIEN
No. They talked it all through on their way back from the church.
THOMAS
If I was still his valet, I'd get it out of him.
MISS O'BRIEN
Bates won't say a word.
THOMAS
He will not? I bet your tanner he's a spy in the other direction. I wanted that job. We were all right together, His Lordship and me.
MISS O'BRIEN
Then be sure to get your foot in the door when Bates is gone.
THOMAS
Can't get rid of him just 'cause he talks behind our backs.
MISS O'BRIEN
There's more than one way to skin a cat.

[INT. LADY MARY'S BEDROOM - EVENING]
[Anna fixes Mary's hair.]
ANNA
Perhaps she misunderstood.
LADY MARY
No, it was quite plain. O'Brien told her Bates can't do the job properly. Why was he taken on?
ANNA
Oh, he was Lord Grantham's batman when he was fighting the Boers.
LADY MARY
I know that, but even so.
LADY SYBIL
I think it's romantic.
LADY MARY
I don't. How can a valet do his work if he's lame?
ANNA
He's not very lame.
[Anna finishes Mary's hair.]
ANNA
There. Anything else before I go down?
LADY MARY
No, that's it. Thank you.

[Mary looks at herself in the full mirror as Anna exits.]
LADY MARY
Oh, I hate black.
LADY SYBIL
It's not for long. Mama says we can go into half-mourning next month and back to colours by September.
LADY MARY
It still seems a lot for a cousin.
LADY EDITH
But not a fianc?
LADY MARY
He wasn't really a fianc?
LADY EDITH
No? I thought that was what you call a man you're going to marry.
LADY MARY
I was only going to marry him if nothing better turned up.
LADY SYBIL
Mary, what a horrid thing to say.
LADY MARY
Don't worry, Edith would've taken him, wouldn't you?
LADY EDITH
Yes, I'd have taken him. If you had given me the chance, I'd have taken him like a shot.

[INT. SERVANTS' CORRIDOR - EVENING]
THOMAS
I just think you should know it's not working, Mr Carson.
MR CARSON
Do you mean Mr Bates is lazy?
THOMAS
Not lazy...exactly. But he just can't carry. He can hardly manage His Lordship's cases. You saw how it was when they went out to London for the memorial. He can't help with the guest luggage neither, and as for waiting a table, we can forget that.
MR CARSON
And what do you want me to do?
THOMAS
Well, it's not for me to say. But is it fair on William to have all the extra work? I don't believe you'd like to think the house was falling below the way things ought to be.
MR CARSON
I would not.
THOMAS
That's all I'm saying.

[INT. LADY MARY'S BEDROOM - EVENING]
[Mary stares at her reflection in the looking glass. Sybil pops her head in.]
LADY SYBIL
I'm going down. Coming?
LADY MARY
In a moment. You go.
[Sybil enters and closes the door.]
LADY SYBIL
I know you're sad about Patrick. Whatever you say, I know it.
LADY MARY
You're a darling. But you see, I'm not as sad as I should be. And that's what makes me sad.

[INT. LORD GRANTHAM'S DRESSING ROOM - EVENING]
[Bates brushes down Robert's tailcoat.]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Thank you.
[Bates drops the brush.]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I'll do that.
MR BATES
No. No, thank you, milord. I can do it.
[Bates picks up the brush.]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I'm sure.
MR BATES
I hope so, milord. I hope you are sure.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Bates, we have to be sensible. I won't be doing you a favour in the long run if it's too much for you. No matter what we've been through, it's got to work.
MR BATES
Of course it has, sir. I mean, milord.
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Do you miss the army, Bates?
MR BATES
I miss a lot of things, but you have to keep moving, don't you?
[Robert chuckles.]
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
You do, indeed.
MR BATES
I'll show you, milord, I promise. I won't let you down. We've managed so far, haven't we?
ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Yes, we have. Of course we have.