《暮色》有声名著第七章05(中英对照)

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2010-12-31 15:29

《暮色》有声名著第七章05(中英对照)

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贝拉将自己流放到了福克斯这个偏僻且终年阴雨的小镇上。她怎么也想不到,就是这个抉择,让她与他相遇在命运的十字路口。眼神交会的那一瞬,彼此之间已经明白,等待他们的,除了幸福的诱惑,还有危险的深渊。互相倾心的两人,在爱情与危险间摆荡,一起度过新鲜而刺激的每一天,就像久违的阳光一样,洒落在浪漫的暮光之城。

I was glad to leave campus, so I would be free to pout and mope before I went out tonight with Jessica and company. But right after I walked in the door of Charlie's house, Jessica called to cancel our plans. I tried to be happy that Mike had asked her out to dinner — I really was relieved that he finally seemed to be catching on — but my enthusiasm sounded false in my own ears. She rescheduled our shopping trip for tomorrow night.

Which left me with little in the way of distractions. I had fish marinating for dinner, with a salad and bread left over from the night before, so there was nothing to do there. I spent a focused half hour on homework, but then I was through with that, too. I checked my e-mail, reading the backlog of letters from my mother, getting snippier as they progressed to the present. I sighed and typed a quick response.

Mom, Sorry. I've been out. I went to the beach with some friends. And I had to write a paper. My excuses were fairly pathetic, so I gave up on that.

It's sunny outside today - I know, I'm shocked, too - so I'm going to go outside and soak up as much vitamin D as I can. I love you, Bella.

I decided to kill an hour with non-school-related reading. I had a small collection of books that came with me to Forks, the shabbiest volume being a compilation of the works of Jane Austen. I selected that one and headed to the backyard, grabbing a ragged old quilt from the linen cupboard at the top of the stairs on my way down.

Outside in Charlie's small, square yard, I folded the quilt in half and laid it out of the reach of the trees' shadows on the thick lawn that would always be slightly wet, no matter how long the sun shone. I lay on my stomach, crossing my ankles in the air, flipping through the different novels in the book, trying to decide which would occupy my mind the most thoroughly. My favorites were Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. I'd read the first most recently, so I started into Sense and Sensibility, only to remember after I began three that the hero of the story happened to be named Edward. Angrily, I turned to Mansfield Park, but the hero of that piece was named Edmund, and that was just too close. Weren't there any other names available in the late eighteenth century? I snapped the book shut, annoyed, and rolled over onto my back. I pushed my sleeves up as high as they would go, and closed my eyes. I would think of nothing but the warmth on my skin, I told myself severely. The breeze was still light, but it blew tendrils of my hair around my face, and that tickled a bit. I pulled all my hair over my head, letting it fan out on the quilt above me, and focused again on the heat that touched my eyelids, my cheekbones, my nose, my lips, my forearms, my neck, soaked through my light shirt…

The next thing I was conscious of was the sound of Charlie's cruiser turning onto the bricks of the driveway. I sat up in surprise, realizing the light was gone, behind the trees, and I had fallen asleep. I looked around, muddled, with the sudden feeling that I wasn't alone.

"Charlie?" I asked. But I could hear his door slamming in front of the house.

I jumped up, foolishly edgy, gathering the now-damp quilt and my book. I ran inside to get some oil heating on the stove, realizing that dinner would be late. Charlie was hanging up his gun belt and stepping out of his boots when I came in.

"Sorry, Dad, dinner's not ready yet — I fell asleep outside." I stifled a yawn.

"Don't worry about it," he said. "I wanted to catch the score on the game, anyway."

I watched TV with Charlie after dinner, for something to do. There wasn't anything on I wanted to watch, but he knew I didn't like baseball, so he turned it to some mindless sitcom that neither of us enjoyed. He seemed happy, though, to be doing something together. And it felt good, despite my depression, to make him happy.

"Dad," I said during a commercial, "Jessica and Angela are going to look at dresses for the dance tomorrow night in Port Angeles, and they wanted me to help them choose… do you mind if I go with them?"

"Jessica Stanley?" he asked.

"And Angela Weber." I sighed as I gave him the details.

He was confused. "But you're not going to the dance, right?"

"No, Dad, but I'm helping them find dresses — you know, giving them constructive criticism." I wouldn't have to explain this to a woman.

"Well, okay." He seemed to realize that he was out of his depth with the girlie stuff. "It's a school night, though."

"We'll leave right after school, so we can get back early. You'll be okay for dinner, right?"

"Bells, I fed myself for seventeen years before you got here," he reminded me.

"I don't know how you survived," I muttered, then added more clearly, "I'll leave some things for cold-cut sandwiches in the fridge, okay? Right on top."

It was sunny again in the morning. I awakened with renewed hope that I grimly tried to suppress. I dressed for the warmer weather in a deep blue V-neck blouse — something I'd worn in the dead of winter in Phoenix.

I had planned my arrival at school so that I barely had time to make it to class. With a sinking heart, I circled the full lot looking for a space, while also searching for the silver Volvo that was clearly not there. I parked in the last row and hurried to English, arriving breathless, but subdued, before the final bell.

It was the same as yesterday — I just couldn't keep little sprouts of hope from budding in my mind, only to have them squashed painfully as I searched the lunchroom in vain and sat at my empty Biology table.

The Port Angeles scheme was back on again for tonight and made all the more attractive by the fact that Lauren had other obligations. I was anxious to get out of town so I could stop glancing over my shoulder, hoping to see him appearing out of the blue the way he always did. I vowed to myself that I would be in a good mood tonight and not ruin Angela's or Jessica's enjoyment in the dress hunting. Maybe I could do a little clothes shopping as well. I refused to think that I might be shopping alone in Seattle this weekend, no longer interested in the earlier arrangement. Surely he wouldn't cancel without at least telling me.

After school, Jessica followed me home in her old white Mercury so that I could ditch my books and truck. I brushed through my hair quickly when I was inside, feeling a slight lift of excitement as I contemplated getting out of Forks. I left a note for Charlie on the table, explaining again where to find dinner, switched my scruffy wallet from my school bag to a purse I rarely used, and ran out to join Jessica. We went to Angela's house next, and she was waiting for us. My excitement increased exponentially as we actually drove out of the town limits.

By dint of much elbow grease, I was able to get both windows in the truck almost completely rolled down. I was one of the first ones to school; I hadn't even checked the clock in my hurry to get outside. I parked and headed toward the seldom-used picnic benches on the south side of the cafeteria. The benches were still a little damp, so I sat on my jacket, glad to have a use for it. My homework was done — the product of a slow social life — but there were a few Trig problems I wasn't sure I had right. I took out my book industriously, but halfway through rechecking the first problem I was daydreaming, watching the sunlight play on the red-barked trees. I sketched inattentively along the margins of my homework. After a few minutes, I suddenly realized I'd drawn five pairs of dark eyes staring out of the page at me. I scrubbed them out with the eraser.

"Bella!" I heard someone call, and it sounded like Mike.

I looked around to realize that the school had become populated while I'd been sitting there, absentminded. Everyone was in t-shirts, some even in shorts though the temperature couldn't be over sixty. Mike was coming toward me in khaki shorts and a striped Rugby shirt, waving.

"Hey, Mike," I called, waving back, unable to be halfhearted on a morning like this.

He came to sit by me, the tidy spikes of his hair shining golden in the light, his grin stretching across his face. He was so delighted to see me, I couldn't help but feel gratified.

"I never noticed before — your hair has red in it," he commented, catching between his fingers a strand that was fluttering in the light breeze.

"Only in the sun."

I became just a little uncomfortable as he tucked the lock behind my ear.

"Great day, isn't it?"

"My kind of day," I agreed.

"What did you do yesterday?" His tone was just a bit too proprietary.

"I mostly worked on my essay." I didn't add that I was finished with it — no need to sound smug.

He hit his forehead with the heel of his hand. "Oh yeah — that's due Thursday, right?"

"Um, Wednesday, I think."

"Wednesday?" He frowned. "That's not good… What are you writing yours on?"

"Whether Shakespeare's treatment of the female characters is misogynistic."

He stared at me like I'd just spoken in pig Latin.

"I guess I'll have to get to work on that tonight," he said, deflated. "I was going to ask if you wanted to go out."

"Oh." I was taken off guard. Why couldn't I ever have a pleasant conversation with Mike anymore without it getting awkward?

"Well, we could go to dinner or something… and I could work on it later." He smiled at me hopefully.

"Mike…" I hated being put on the spot. "I don't think that would be the best idea."

His face fell. "Why?" he asked, his eyes guarded. My thoughts flickered to Edward, wondering if that's where his thoughts were as well.

"I think… and if you ever repeat what I'm saying right now I will cheerfully beat you to death," I threatened, "but I think that would hurt Jessica's feelings."

He was bewildered, obviously not thinking in that direction at all. "Jessica?"

"Really, Mike, are you blind?"

"Oh," he exhaled — clearly dazed. I took advantage of that to make my escape.

"It's time for class, and I can't be late again." I gathered my books up and stuffed them in my bag.

We walked in silence to building three, and his expression was distracted. I hoped whatever thoughts he was immersed in were leading him in the right direction.

When I saw Jessica in Trig, she was bubbling with enthusiasm. She, Angela, and Lauren were going to Port Angeles tonight to go dress shopping for the dance, and she wanted me to come, too, even though I didn't need one. I was indecisive. It would be nice to get out of town with some girlfriends, but Lauren would be there. And who knew what I could be doing tonight… But that was definitely the wrong path to let my mind wander down. Of course I was happy about the sunlight. But that wasn't completely responsible for the euphoric mood I was in, not even close.

So I gave her a maybe, telling her I'd have to talk with Charlie first.

She talked of nothing but the dance on the way to Spanish, continuing as if without an interruption when class finally ended, five minutes late, and we were on our way to lunch. I was far too lost in my own frenzy of anticipation to notice much of what she said. I was painfully eager to see not just him but all the Cullens — to compare them with the new suspicions that plagued my mind. As I crossed the threshold of the cafeteria, I felt the first true tingle of fear slither down my spine and settle in my stomach. Would they be able to know what I was thinking? And then a different feeling jolted through me — would Edward be waiting to sit with me again?

As was my routine, I glanced first toward the Cullens' table. A shiver of panic trembled in my stomach as I realized it was empty. With dwindling hope, my eyes scoured the rest of the cafeteria, hoping to find him alone, waiting for me. The place was nearly filled — Spanish had made us late — but there was no sign of Edward or any of his family. Desolation hit me with crippling strength.

I shambled along behind Jessica, not bothering to pretend to listen anymore.

We were late enough that everyone was already at our table. I avoided the empty chair next to Mike in favor of one by Angela. I vaguely noticed that Mike held the chair out politely for Jessica, and that her face lit up in response.

Angela asked a few quiet questions about the Macbeth paper, which I answered as naturally as I could while spiraling downward in misery. She, too, invited me to go with them tonight, and I agreed now, grasping at anything to distract myself.

I realized I'd been holding on to a last shred of hope when I entered Biology, saw his empty seat, and felt a new wave of disappointment.

The rest of the day passed slowly, dismally. In Gym, we had a lecture on the rules of badminton, the next torture they had lined up for me. But at least it meant I got to sit and listen instead of stumbling around on the court. The best part was the coach didn't finish, so I got another day off tomorrow. Never mind that the day after they would arm me with a racket before unleashing me on the rest of the class.

我很高兴能离开学校,这样我就能在今晚陪着杰西卡出去以前自由自在地发脾气和意志消沉了。但正当我走进查理家大门的时候,杰西卡打电话来取消了我们的计划。我试图为迈克邀请她出去吃晚餐感到高兴——我确实为他最终明白过来而感到宽慰——但我热切的声音在我自己耳中显得很假。她把我们的购物之旅顺延到了明天晚上。
这就让我几乎没有了可以分心的事。我把鱼放进调味汁里腌好,又做了一个沙拉,再加上昨天晚上剩下的面包,晚餐就准备好了,再也没有什么事可做了。我花了半小时专心致志地写作业,但又把作业给写完了。我检查自己的电子邮件,看着积攒下来的我母亲发来的邮件,时间越靠后的语气越显暴躁。我叹了口气,打了一封简短的回复。

“妈妈,

抱歉。我出去了。我和几个朋友一起去了海滩。而且我还有一份论文要写。“

我的借口听起来相当地可悲,所以我放弃了,换成了下面这封。

“今天外面晴朗极了——我知道,我也很震惊——所以我打算到外面去,尽可能地多吸收一些维生素D。我爱你。

贝拉“

我决定用课外阅读来打发掉一个小时的时间。在我来福克斯的时候我随身带了一些藏书,其中最残破的那一册是简?奥斯丁的作品集。我挑出那本书,向后院走去,下楼的时候顺手从楼梯顶上的亚麻布衣橱里抓了一条破旧的褥子。

在查理小小的,四四方方的庭院里,我把那条褥子对叠了一下,把它放到树阴之外的草坪上。不管阳光照射多久,那块草坪永远都是微微湿润着的。我趴下来,把脚踝在空中交叠,飞快地浏览着书里的每一篇小时,试图决定哪一篇最能让我沉迷其中。我最喜欢的是《傲慢与偏见》和《理智与情感》。前者我读得最多,所以我开始看《理智与情感》,但在看了三页以后却想起来这个故事的主人公碰巧也叫爱德华。我愤怒地转去看《曼菲尔德庄园》,但这一篇的主人公叫埃德蒙,实在是太相近了。十八世纪末就没有别的名字可用了吗?我啪地合上书,气恼地把书扔过头顶。我把袖子挽到最高的地方,然后闭上了眼睛。我严厉地对自己说,我什么也不要想,只想让我的肌肤暖和起来。微风轻轻吹拂着,却把我脸旁的头发吹得卷曲起来,这样很痒。我把头发全部拢到脑后,让它呈扇形披散在我身上的褥子上,然后又一次把心思放在阳光的热度上。暖烘烘的阳光落在我的眼皮上,我的颧骨上,我的鼻子上,我的嘴唇上,我的小臂上,我的脖子上,浸透了我轻薄的衬衣……

接下来我听到了查理的巡逻车碾上车道的砖块的声音。我吃惊地坐起来,发觉光线已经消失在了树丛后。我方才睡着了。我茫然地环顾四周,忽然意识到我不是一个人。

“查理?“我出声询问道。但我能听到从房子前头传来的他关门的声音。

我跳起来,急躁得有些可笑,收拾起已经有些潮湿的褥子和书。我冲进屋里,往锅里放了点油,开始加热,意识到晚餐要推迟了。当我进来的时候,查理正在把武装带挂起来,脱下靴子。

“抱歉,爸爸,晚餐还没好——我在屋外睡着了。“我的话被呵欠打断了。

“别担心,“他说。“总之,我想先看看赛事的比分情况。“

为了找些事干,晚饭后我和查理一起看电视。没什么我想看的节目,但他知道我不喜欢篮球,所以他换了台,切换到某个我们都不怎么喜欢的情景喜剧。但他还是很开心,因为我们能待在一起做点什么。如果不去管我的失落的话,让他高兴是件不错的事。

“爸爸,“插播广告的时候我说道。“杰西卡和安吉拉打算明天晚上去天使港去找舞会穿的衣服,她们想让我帮忙挑选……你介意我跟她们一起去吗?“

“杰西卡?斯坦利?“他问道。

“还有安吉拉?韦伯。“我叹了口气,给了他更加详尽的信息。

他很困惑:“可你不打算去舞会,对吧?“

“我不去,爸爸。但我可以帮她们找衣服——你知道,给她们一点有建设性的意见。“如果是跟一个女人说话,我就不用解释这些了。

“嗯,好吧。“他似乎意识到他离少女的世界太远了。“不过,这是上学的晚上。“

“我们一放学就去,这样我们就可以早点回来。你要自己解决晚餐,没问题吧?“

“贝尔,在你到这儿来以前,我自力更生了十七年。“他提醒我。

“我不知道你是怎么活下来的。“我嘟囔着,然后更清晰地补充道。“我会在冰箱里留一点做冷餐三明治的食材,好吗?就在冰箱上层。“
这天早上又是晴空万里。我又燃起了新的希望,虽然我冷漠地试图把这种感觉给压下去。因为天气更暖和了,我穿上了一件深蓝色V领短打衫——这是我在凤凰城冬天最冷的时候才会穿的衣服。

我精确地安排着到校时间,这样我就能刚好赶上上课了。我心里沉甸甸的,满停车场兜着圈子找空位,同时也是在找那辆银色沃尔沃,但它显然不在。我把车停到最后一排,然后匆忙地跑去上英语课,上气不接下气地赶到了教室,然后在最后一声铃响前缓了过来。

今天和昨天完全一样——只是我没能保住心头萌发的小小希望之芽。当我徒劳地搜索着午餐室,当我坐到空荡荡的生物实验桌旁时,我只能痛苦地把它们扼杀掉。

天使港计划今晚将重新启动,让一切变得更有吸引力的是劳伦另有贵干的事实。我迫不及待地想要到镇外去,这样我就能停下来不再从肩膀上看过去,希望能看见他像平常一样出人意料地出现在那里。我向自己发誓,我今晚要过得非常愉快,而且不能在扫货的时候让安吉拉或者杰西卡扫兴。也许我也应该买点衣服。我拒绝想到这周末我可能得孤零零地在西雅图购物,对更早些时候的行程安排毫无兴致。当然,他不会单方面地取消约定的,至少会告诉我一声。

放学后,杰西卡开着她老掉牙的白色水星跟着我回家,这样我就能把书和车扔在家里。当我在屋里的时候,我飞快地刷了几下头发。一想到能逃离福克斯,我就感到一阵轻微的亢奋。我在桌上给查理留了张纸条,再次告诉他在哪里可以找到他的晚饭,然后从我的书包里取出那个破旧的钱夹,把里面的东西都转到一只我很少用的钱包里,然后跑出去找杰西卡。接下来我们去了安吉拉家,她正等着我们。当我们真的开出小镇的范围时,我的兴奋开始以指数形式增长。