《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十章02(中英对照)

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2011-5-13 14:56

《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十章02(中英对照)

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《呼啸山庄》是英国女作家勃朗特姐妹之一艾米莉·勃朗特的作品。小说描写吉卜赛弃儿希 斯克利夫被山庄老主人收养后,因受辱和恋爱不遂,外出致富,回来后对与其女友凯瑟琳结婚的地主林顿及其子女进行报复的故事。全篇充满强烈的反压迫、争幸福 的斗争精神,又始终笼罩着离奇、紧张的浪漫气氛。它开始曾被人看做是年青女作家脱离现实的天真幻想,但结合其所描写地区激烈的阶级斗争和英国的社会现象, 它不久便被评论界高度肯定,并受到读者的热烈欢迎。根据这部小说改编的影视作品至今久演不衰。

Chapter30-02

`Joseph and I generally go to chapel on Sundays'; the kirk, you know, has no minister now, explained Mrs Dean; and they call the Methodists' or Baptists' place (I can't say which it is), at Gimmerton, a chapel. `Joseph had gone,' she continued, `but I thought proper to bide at home. Young folks are always the better for an elder's overlooking; and Hareton, with all his bashfulness, isn't a model of nice behaviour. I let him know that his cousin would very likely sit with us, and she had been always used to see the Sabbath respected; so he had as good leave his guns and bits of indoor work alone, while she stayed. He coloured up at the news, and cast his eyes over his hands and clothes. The train-oil and gunpowder were shoved out of sight in a minute. I saw he meant to give her his company; and I guessed, by his way, he wanted to be presentable; so, laughing, as I durst not laugh when the master is by, I offered to help him, if he would, and joked at his confusion. He grew sullen, and began to swear.

`Now, Mrs Dean,' Zillah went on, seeing me not pleased by her manner, `you happen think your young lady too fine for Mr Hareton; and happen you're right: but I own I should love well to bring her pride a peg lower. And what will all her learning and her daintiness do for her, now? She's as poor as you or I: poorer I'll be bound: you're saving, and I'm doing my little all that road.'? Hareton allowed Zillah to give him her aid; and she flattered him into a good humour: so, when Catherine came, half forgetting her former insults, he tried to make himself agreeable, by the housekeeper's account.

`Missis walked in', she said, `as chill as an icicle, and as high as a princess. I got up and offered her my seat in the armchair. No, she turned up her nose at my civility. Earnshaw rose, too, and bid her come to the settle, and sit close by the fire: he was sure she was starved.

`"I've been starved a month and more," she answered, resting on the word as scornful as she could.

`And she got a chair for herself, and placed it at a distance from both of us. Having sat till she was warm, she began to look round, and discovered a number of books in the dresser; she was instantly upon her feet again, stretching to reach them: but they were too high up. Her cousin, after watching her endeavours a while, at last summoned courage to help her; she held her frock, and he filled it with the first that came to hand.

`That was a great advance for the lad. She didn't thank him; still, he felt gratified that she had accepted his assistance, and ventured to stand behind as she examined them, and even to stoop and point out what struck his fancy in certain old pictures which they contained; nor was he daunted by the saucy style in which she jerked the page from his finger: he contented himself with going a bit farther back, and looking at her instead of the book. She continued reading, or seeking for something to read. His attention became, by degrees, quite centred in the study of her thick, silky curls: her face he couldn't see, and she couldn't see him. And, perhaps, not quite awake to what he did, but attracted like a child to a candle, at last he proceeded from staring to touching; he put out his hand and stroked one curl, as gently as if it were a bird. He might have stuck a knife into her neck, she started round in such a taking.

`"Get away, this moment! How dare you touch me? Why are you stopping there?" she cried, in a tone of disgust. "I can't endure you! I'll go upstairs again, if you come near me."

`Mr Hareton recoiled, looking as foolish as he could do: he sat down in the settle very quiet, and she continued turning over her volumes another half-hour; finally, Earnshaw crossed over, and whispered to me:

`"Will you ask her to read to us, Zillah? I'm stalled of doing naught; and I do like--I could like to hear her! Dunnot say I wanted it, but ask of yourseln."

`"Mr Hareton wishes you would read to us, ma'am," I said immediately. "He'd take it very kind--he'd be much obliged."

`She frowned; and looking up, answered:

`"Mr Hareton, and the whole set of you, will be good enough to understand that I reject any pretence at kindness you have the hypocrisy to offer! I despise you, and will have nothing to say to any of you! When I would have given my life for one kind word, even to see one of your faces, you all kept off. But I won't complain to you! I'm driven down here by the cold; not either to amuse you or enjoy your society."

`"What could I ha' done?" began Earnshaw. "How was I to blame?"

`"Oh! you are an exception," answered Mrs Heathcliff. "I never missed such a concern as you."

`"But I offered more than once, and asked," he said, kindling up at her pertness, "I asked Mr Heathcliff to let me wake for you ?`"Be silent! I'll go out of doors, or anywhere, rather than have your disagreeable voice in my ear!" said my lady.

`Hareton muttered she might go to hell, for him! and unslinging his gun, restrained himself from his Sunday occupations no longer. He talked now, freely enough; and she presently saw fit to retreat to her solitude: but the frost had set in, and, in spite of her pride, she was forced to condescend to our company, more and more. However, I took care there should be no further scorning at my good nature: ever since, I've been as stiff as herself; and she has no lover or liker among us: and she does not deserve one; for, let them say the least word to her, and she'll curl back without respect of anyone! She'll snap at the master himself, and as good as dares him to thrash her; and the more hurt she gets, the more venomous she grows.'

At first, on hearing this account from Zillah, I determined to leave my situation, take a cottage, and get Catherine to come and live with me: but Mr Heathcliff would as soon permit that as he would set up Hareton in an independent house; and I can see no remedy, at present, unless she could marry again: and that scheme it does not come within my province to arrange.

Thus ended Mrs Dean's story. Notwithstanding the doctor's prophecy, I am rapidly recovering strength; and though it be only the second week in January, I propose getting out on horseback in a day or two, and riding over to Wuthering Heights, to inform my landlord that I shall spend the next six months in London; and, if he likes, he may look out for another tenant to take the place after October. I would not pass another winter here for much.

第三十章02

“约瑟夫和我经常在星期日到礼拜堂去。“(你知道,现在教堂没有牧师了,丁太太解释着;他们把吉默吞的美以美会或是浸礼会的地方,我说不出是哪一个,叫作礼拜堂。)“约瑟夫已经走了,“她接着说,“但是我想我还是留在家里合适些。年轻人有个年纪大的守着总要好多了;哈里顿,虽然非常羞怯,却不是品行端正的榜样。我让他知道他表妹大概要和我们一道坐着,她总是守安息日的;所以当她待在那儿的时候,他最好别搞他的枪,也别做屋里的零碎事。他听到这消息就脸红了,还看看他的手和衣服。一下工夫鲸油和枪弹药全收起来了。我看他有意要陪她;我根据他的作法猜想,他想使自己体面些;所以,我笑起来,主人在旁我是不敢笑的,我说要是他愿意,我可以帮他忙,而且嘲笑他的慌张。他又不高兴了,开始咒骂起来。

“现在,丁太太,“齐拉接着说,看出我对她的态度不以为然,“你也许以为你的小姐太好,哈里顿先生配不上;也许你是对的:可是我承认我很想把她的傲气压一下。现在她所有的学问和她的文雅对她又有什么用呢?她和你或我一样的贫穷:更穷,我敢说,你是在攒钱,我也在那条路上尽我的小小努力。“

哈里顿允许齐拉帮他忙,她把他奉承得性子变温和了,所以,当凯瑟琳进来时,据那管家说,他把她以前的侮蔑也忘了一半,努力使自己彬彬有礼。

“夫人走进来了,“她说,“跟个冰柱似的,冷冰冰的,又像个公主似的高不可攀。我起身把我坐的扶手椅让给她。不,她翘起鼻子对待我的殷勤。恩萧也站起来了,请她坐在高背椅上,坐在炉火旁边:他说她一定是饿了。

“‘我饿了一个多月了,’她回答。尽力轻蔑地念那个‘饿’字。

“她自己搬了张椅子,摆在离我们两个都相当远的地方。等到她坐暖和了,她开始向四周望着,发现柜子上有些书;她马上站起来,想够到它,可是它太高了。她的表哥望着她试了一会,最后鼓起勇气去帮她;她兜起她的衣服,他一本一本拿下来装满了一兜。

“这对于那个男孩子已是一大进步了。她没有谢他;可是他觉得很感激,因为她接受了他的帮助,在她翻看这些书时,他还大胆地站在后面,甚至还弯身指点引起他的兴趣的书中某些古老的插面;他也没有因她把书页从他手指中猛地一扯的那种无礼态度而受到挫折:他挺乐意地走开些;望着她,而不去看书。她继续看书,或者找些什么可看的。他的注意力渐渐集中在研究她那又厚又亮的卷发上:他看不见她的脸,她也看不见他。也许,他自己也不清楚他作了什么,只是像个孩子被一根蜡烛所吸引一样,终于他从死盯着,后来却开始碰它了,他伸出他的手摸摸一绺卷发,轻轻的,仿佛那是一只鸟儿。就像他在她的脖子上捅进一把小刀似的,她猛然转过身来。

‘马上滚开!你怎么敢碰我?你呆在这儿干吗?’她以一种厌恶的声调大叫,‘我受不了你!要是你走近我,我又要上楼了。’

“哈里顿先生向后退,显得要多蠢就有多蠢;他很安静地坐在长椅上,她继续翻她的书,又过了半个钟头;最后,恩萧走过来,跟我小声说:

“‘你能请她念给我们听吗,齐拉?我都闲腻了:我真喜欢——我会喜欢听她念的!别说我要求她,就说你自己请她念。’

“‘哈里顿先生想让你给我们念一下,太太,’我马上说。‘他会很高兴——他会非常感激的。’

“她皱起眉头,抬起头来,回答说:

“‘哈里顿先生,还有你们这一帮人,请放明白点:我拒绝你们所表示的一切假仁假义!我看不起你们,对你们任何一个人我都没话可说!当我宁愿舍了命想听到一个温和的字眼,甚至想看看你们中间一个人的脸的时候,你们都躲开了。可是我并不要对你们诉苦!我是被寒冷赶到这儿来的;不是来给你们开心或是跟你们作伴的。’

“‘我作了什么错事啦?’恩萧开口了。‘干吗怪我呢?’

“‘啊!你是个例外,’希刺克厉夫夫人回答,‘我从来也不在乎你关不关心我。’

“‘但是我不止一次提过,也请求过,’他说,被她的无礼激怒了,‘我求过希刺克厉夫先生让我代你守夜——’

“‘住口吧!我宁可走出门外,或者去任何地方,也比听你那讨厌的声音在我耳边响好!’我的夫人说。

“哈里顿咕噜着说,在他看来,她还是下地狱去的好!他拿下他的枪,不再约束自己不干他的礼拜天的事了。现在他说话了,挺随便;她立刻看出还是回去守着她的孤寂合适些:但已开始下霜了,她虽然骄傲,也被迫渐渐地和我们接近了。无论如何,我也当心不愿再让她讥讽我对她的好意。打那以后,我和她一样板着脸,在我们中间没有爱她的或喜欢她的人,她也不配有;因为,谁对她说一个字,她就缩起来,对任何人都不尊敬。甚至她对主人也会开火,并且也不怕他打她;她越挨打,她就变得越狠毒。“

起初,听了齐拉这一段话,我就决定离开我的住所,找间茅舍,叫凯瑟琳跟我一块住:可是要希刺克厉夫先生答应,就像要他给哈里顿一所单独住的房子一样;在目前我看不出补救方法来,除非她再嫁,而筹划这件事我又无能为力。

丁太太的故事就这样结束了。尽管有医生的预言,我还是很快地恢复了体力;虽然这不过是元月的第二个星期,可是我打算一两天内骑马到呼啸山庄,去通知我的房东我将在伦敦住上半年,而且,若是他愿意的话,他可以在十月后另找房客来住。我可是无论如何也不要再在这里过一个冬天的了。