《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十一章01(中英对照)

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2011-5-16 09:41

《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十一章01(中英对照)

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《呼啸山庄》是英国女作家勃朗特姐妹之一艾米莉·勃朗特的作品。小说描写吉卜赛弃儿希 斯克利夫被山庄老主人收养后,因受辱和恋爱不遂,外出致富,回来后对与其女友凯瑟琳结婚的地主林顿及其子女进行报复的故事。全篇充满强烈的反压迫、争幸福 的斗争精神,又始终笼罩着离奇、紧张的浪漫气氛。它开始曾被人看做是年青女作家脱离现实的天真幻想,但结合其所描写地区激烈的阶级斗争和英国的社会现象, 它不久便被评论界高度肯定,并受到读者的热烈欢迎。根据这部小说改编的影视作品至今久演不衰。

Chapter31-01

Yesterday was bright, calm, and frosty. I went to the Heights as I proposed; my housekeeper entreated me to bear a little note from her to her young lady, and I did not refuse, for the worthy woman was not conscious of anything odd in her request. The front door stood open, but the jealous gate was fastened, as at my last visit; I knocked, and invoked Earnshaw from among the garden beds; he unchained it, and I entered. The fellow is as handsome a rustic as need be seen. I took particular notice of him this time; but then he does his best, apparently, to make the least of his advantages.

I asked if Mr Heathcliff were at home? He answered, No; but he would be in at dinner time. It was eleven o'clock, and I announced my intention of going in and waiting for him, at which he immediately flung down his tools and accompanied me, in the office of watchdog, not as a substitute for the host.

We entered together; Catherine was there, making herself useful in preparing some vegetables for the approaching meal; she looked more sulky and less spirited than when I had seen her first. She hardly raised her eyes to notice me, and continued her employment with the same disregard to common forms of politeness as before; never returning my bow and good morning by the slightest acknowledgment.

`She does not seem so amiable', I thought, `as Mrs Dean would persuade me to believe. She's a beauty, it is true; but not an angel.'

Earnshaw surlily bid her remove her things to the kitchen. `Remove them yourself,' she said, pushing them from her as soon as she had done; and retiring to a stool by the window, where she began to carve figures of birds and beasts out of the turnip parings in her lap. I approached her, pretending to desire a view of the garden; and, as I fancied, adroitly dropped Mrs Dean's note on to her knee, unnoticed by Hareton--but she asked aloud, `What is that?' and chucked it off.

`A letter from your old acquaintance, the housekeeper at the Grange,' I answered; annoyed at her exposing my kind deed, and fearful lest it should be imagined a missive of my own. She would gladly have gathered it up at this information, but Hareton beat her; he seized and put it in his waistcoat, saying Mr Heathcliff should look at it first. Thereat, Catherine silently turned her face from us, and, very stealthily, drew out her pocket handkerchief and applied it to her eyes; and her cousin, after struggling a while to keep down his softer feelings, pulled out the letter and flung it on the floor beside her, as ungraciously as he could. Catherine caught and perused it eagerly; then she but a few questions to me concerning the inmates, rational and irrational, of her former home; and gazing towards the hills, murmured in soliloquy:

`I should like to be riding Minny down there! I should like to be climbing up there! Oh! I'm tired--I'm stalled, Hareton!' And she leant her pretty head back against the sill, with half a yawn and half a sigh, and lapsed into an aspect of abstracted sadness: neither caring nor knowing whether we remarked her.

`Mrs Heathcliff,' I said, after sitting some time mute, `you are not aware that I am an acquaintance of yours? so intimate that I think it strange you won't come and speak to me. My housekeeper never wearies of talking about and praising you; and she'll be greatly disappointed if I return with no news of or from you, except that you received her letter and said nothing!'

She appeared to wonder at this speech, and asked:

`Does Ellen like you?'

`Yes, very well,' I replied unhesitatingly.

`You must tell her,' she continued, `that I would answer her letter, but l have no materials for writing: not even a book from which I might tear a leaf.'

`No books!' I exclaimed. `How do you contrive to live here without them? if l may take the liberty to inquire. Though provided with a large library, I'm frequently very dull at the Grange; take my books away, and I should be desperate!'

`I was always reading, when I had them,' said Catherine; `and Mr Heathcliff never reads; so he took it into his head to destroy my books. I have not had a glimpse of one for weeks. Only once, I searched through Joseph's store of theology, to his great irritation; and once, Hareton, I came upon a secret stock in your room--some Latin and Greek, and some tales and poetry: all old friends. I brought the last here--and you gathered them, as a magpie gathers silver spoons, for the mere love of stealing! They are of no use to you; or else you concealed them in the bad spirit that as you cannot enjoy them nobody else shall. Perhaps your envy counselled Mr Heathcliff to rob me of my treasures? But I've most of them written on my brain and printed in my heart, and you cannot deprive me of those!'

Earnshaw blushed crimson when his cousin made this revelation of his private literary accumulations, and stammered an indignant denial of her accusations.'

`Mr Hareton is desirous of increasing his amount of knowledge,' I said, coming to his rescue. `He is not envious but emulous of your attainments. He'll be a clever scholar in a few years.'

`And he wants me to sink into a dunce, meantime,' answered Catherine. `Yes, I hear him trying to spell and read to himself, and pretty blunders he makes! I wish you would repeat Chevy Chase as you did yesterday: it was extremely funny. I heard you; and I heard you turning over the dictionary to seek out the hard words, and then cursing because you couldn't read their explanations!'

The young man evidently thought it too bad that he should be laughed at for his ignorance, and then laughed at for trying to remove it. I had a similar notion; and, remembering Mrs Dean's anecdote of his first attempt at enlightening the darkness in which he had been reared, I observed:

`But, Mrs Heathcliff, we have each had a commencement, and each stumbled and tottered on the threshold; had our teachers scorned instead of aiding us, we should stumble and totter yet.'

第三十一章01

昨天晴朗,恬静而寒冷。我照我原来的打算到山庄去了:我的管家求我代她捎个短信给她的小姐,我没有拒绝,因为这个可尊敬的女人并不觉得她的请求有什么奇怪。前门开着,可是像我上次拜访一样,那专为提防外人的栅门是拴住的:我敲了门,把恩萧从花圃中引出来了;他解开了门链,我走进去。这个家伙作为一个乡下人是够漂亮的。这次我特别注意他,可是显然他却一点也不会利用他的优点。

我问希刺克厉夫先生是否在家?他回答说,不在;但他在吃饭时会在家的。那时是十一点钟了,我就宣称我打算进去等他;他听了就立刻丢下他的工具,陪我进去,并不是代表主人,而是执行看家狗的职务而已。

我们一同进去;凯瑟琳在那儿,正在预备蔬菜为午饭时吃,这样她也算是在出力了;她比我第一次见她时显得更阴郁些也更没精神。她简直没抬眼睛看我,像以前一样的不顾一般形式的礼貌,始终没稍微点下头来回答我的鞠躬和问候早安。

“她看来并不怎么讨人喜欢。“我想,“不像丁太太想使我相信的那样。她是个美人,的确,但不是个天使。“

恩萧执拗地叫她将蔬菜搬到厨房去。“你自己搬吧。“她说,她一弄完就把那些一推;而且在窗前的一张凳子上坐下来,在那儿她用她怀中的萝卜皮开始刻些鸟兽形。我走近她,假装想看看花园景致,而且,依我看来,很灵巧地把丁太太的短笺丢在她的膝盖上了,并没让哈里顿注意到——可是她大声问:“那是什么?“而冷笑着把它丢开了。

“你的老朋友,田庄管家,写来的信。“我回答,对于她揭穿我的好心的行为颇感烦恼,深怕她把这当作是我自己的信了。她听了这话本可以高兴地拾起它来,可是哈里顿胜过了她。他抓到手,塞在他的背心口袋里,说希刺克厉夫先生得先看看。于是,凯瑟琳默默地转过脸去,而且偷偷地掏出她的手绢,擦着她的眼睛;她的表哥,在为压下他的软心肠挣扎了一番之后,又把信抽出来,十分不客气地丢在她旁边的地板上。凯瑟琳拿到了,热切地读着;然后,她时而清楚时而糊涂地问我几句关于她从前的家的情况;并且呆望着那些小山,喃喃自语着:

“我多想骑着敏妮到那儿去!我多想爬上去!啊!我厌倦了——我给关起来啦,哈里顿!“她将她那漂亮的头仰靠在窗台上,一半是打哈欠,一半是叹息,沉入一种茫然的悲哀状态;不管,也不知道我们是否注意她。

“希刺克厉夫夫人,“我默坐了一会之后说,“你还不知道我是你的一个熟人吧?我对你很感亲切,我认为你不肯过来跟我说话是奇怪的。我的管家从不嫌烦的说起你,还称赞你;如果我回去没有带回一点关于你或是你给她的消息,只说你收到了她的信,而且没说什么,她将要非常失望的!“

她看来好像对这段话很惊讶,就问:

“艾伦喜欢你吗?“

“是的,很喜欢。“我毫不踌躇地回答。

“你一定要告诉她。“她接着说,“我想回她信,可是我没有写字用的东西:连一本可以撕下一张纸的书都没有。“

“没有书!“我叫着。“假如我有发问自由的话,你在这儿没有书怎么还过得下去的?虽然我有个很大的书房,我在田庄还往往很闷;要把我的书拿走,我就要拚命啦!“

“当我有书的时候,我总是看书,“凯瑟琳说,“而希刺克厉夫从来不看书;所以他就起了念头把我的书毁掉。好几个星期我没有看到一本书了。只有一次,我翻翻约瑟夫藏的宗教书,把他惹得大怒;还有一次,哈里顿,我在你屋里看到一堆秘密藏起来的书——有些拉丁文和希腊文,还有些故事和诗歌:全是老朋友。诗歌是我带来的——你把它们收起来,像喜鹊收集钥匙似的,只是爱偷而已——它们对你并没用;不然就是你恶意把它们藏起来,既然你不能享受,就叫别人也休想。或者是你出于嫉妒,给希刺克厉夫先生出主意把我的珍藏抢去吧?但是大多数的书写在我的脑子里,而且刻在我的心里,你就没法把那些从我这儿夺走!“

当他的表妹宣布了他私下收集文学书时,恩萧的脸通红,结结巴巴地,恼怒地否认对他的指控。

“哈里顿先生热望着增长他的知识。“我说,为他解围。

“他不是嫉妒你的学识,而是想与你的学识竞争。①几年内他会成为一个有才智的学者的。“

①原文是故意用这两个字,因为“嫉妒“是用“envious“,“竞争“是用“emu-lous“(见贤思齐之意),这里用来求其音近。

“同时他却要我变成一个呆瓜。“凯瑟琳回答。“是的,我听他自己试着拼音朗读,他搞出多少错来呀!但愿你再念一遍猎歌,像昨天念的那样:那是太可笑了。我听见你念的,我听见你翻字典查生字,然后咒骂着,因为你读不懂那些解释!“

这个年轻人显然觉得太糟了,他先是因为愚昧无知而被人人嘲笑,而后为了努力改掉它却又被人嘲笑。我也有类似的看法;我记起丁太太所说的关于他最初曾打算冲破他从小养成的蒙昧的轶事,我就说:

“可是,希刺克厉夫夫人,我们每人都有个开始,每个人都在门槛上跌跌爬爬。要是我们的老师只会嘲弄而不帮助我们,我们还要跌跌爬爬哩。“