《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十一章02(中英对照)

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2011-5-17 09:09

《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十一章02(中英对照)

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《呼啸山庄》是英国女作家勃朗特姐妹之一艾米莉·勃朗特的作品。小说描写吉卜赛弃儿希 斯克利夫被山庄老主人收养后,因受辱和恋爱不遂,外出致富,回来后对与其女友凯瑟琳结婚的地主林顿及其子女进行报复的故事。全篇充满强烈的反压迫、争幸福 的斗争精神,又始终笼罩着离奇、紧张的浪漫气氛。它开始曾被人看做是年青女作家脱离现实的天真幻想,但结合其所描写地区激烈的阶级斗争和英国的社会现象, 它不久便被评论界高度肯定,并受到读者的热烈欢迎。根据这部小说改编的影视作品至今久演不衰。

Chapter31-02

`Oh!' she replied, `I don't wish to limit his acquirements: still, he has no right to appropriate what is mine, and make it ridiculous to me with his vile mistakes and mispronunciations! Those books, both prose and verse, were consecrated to me by other associations; and I hate to have them debased and profaned in his mouth! Besides, of all, he has selected my favourite pieces that I love the most to repeat, as if out of deliberate malice.'

Hareton's chest heaved in silence a minute: he laboured under a severe sense of mortification and wrath, which it was no easy task to suppress. I rose, and, from a gentlemanly idea of relieving his embarrassment, took up my station in the doorway, surveying the external prospect as I stood. He followed my example, and left the room; but presently reappeared, bearing half a dozen volumes in his hands, which he threw into Catherine's lap, exclaiming:

`Take them! I never want to hear, or read, or think of them again!'

`I won't have them now,' she answered. `I shall connect them with you, and hate them.'

She opened one that had obviously been often turned over, and read a portion in the drawling tone of a beginner; then laughed, and threw it from her. `And listen,' she continued provokingly, commencing a verse of an old ballad in the same fashion.

But his self-love would endure no further torment: I heard, and not altogether disapprovingly, a manual check given to her saucy tongue. The little wretch had done her utmost to hurt her cousin s sensitive though uncultivated feelings, and a physical argument was the only mode he had of balancing the account, and repaying its effects on the inflicter. He afterwards gathered the books and hurled them on the fire. I read in his countenance what anguish it was to offer that sacrifice to spleen. I fancied that as they consumed, he recalled the pleasure they had already imparted, and the triumph and ever-increasing pleasure he had anticipated from them; and I fancied I guessed the incitement to his secret studies also. He had been content with daily labour and rough animal enjoyments, till Catherine crossed his path. Shame at her scorn, and hope of her approval, were his first prompters to higher pursuits; and, instead of guarding him from one and winning him to the other, his endeavours to rise himself had produced just the contrary result.

`Yes; that's all the good that such a brute as you can get from them!' cried Catherine, sucking her damaged lip, and watching the conflagration with indignant eyes.

`You'd better hold your tongue, now,' he answered fiercely.

And his agitation precluding further speech, he advanced hastily to the entrance, where I made way for him to pass. But ere he had crossed the doorstones, Mr Heathcliff, coming up the causeway, encountered him, and laying hold of his shoulder, asked:

"What's to do now, my lad?'

`Naught, naught,' he said, and broke away to enjoy his grief and anger in solitude.

Heathcliff gazed after him, and sighed.

`It will be odd if I thwart myself,' he muttered, unconscious that I was behind him. `But when I look for his father in his face, I find her every day more. How the devil is he so like? I can hardly bear to see him.'

He bent his eyes to the ground, and walked moodily in. There was a restless, anxious expression in his countenance I had never remarked there before; and he looked sparer in person. His daughter-in-law, on perceiving him through the window, immediately escaped to the kitchen, so that I remained alone.

`I'm glad to see you out of doors again, Mr Lockwood,' he said, in reply to my greeting; `from selfish motives partly: I don't think I could readily supply your loss in this desolation. I've wondered more than once what brought you here.

`An idle whim, I fear, sir,' was my answer; `or else an idle whim is going to spirit me away. I shall set out for London, next week; and I must give you warning that I feel no disposition to retain Thrushcross Grange beyond the twelve months I agreed to rent it. 1 believe I shall not live there any more.'

`Oh, indeed; you're tired of being banished from the world, are you?' he said. `But if you be coming to plead off paying for a place you won't occupy, your journey is useless: I never relent in exacting my due from anyone.'

`I'm coming to plead off nothing about it,' I exclaimed, considerably irritated. `Should you wish it, I'll settle with you now,' and I drew my notebook from my pocket.

`No, no,' he replied coolly; `you'll leave sufficient behind to cover your debts, if you fail to return: I'm not in such a hurry. Sit down and take your dinner with us; a guest that is safe from repeating his visit can generally be made welcome. Catherine, bring the things in: where are you?'

Catherine reappeared, bearing a tray of knives and forks.

`You may get your dinner with Joseph,' muttered Heathcliff aside, `and remain in the kitchen till he is gone.'

She obeyed his directions very punctually: perhaps she had no temptation to transgress. Living among clowns and misanthropists, she probably cannot appreciate a better class of people when she meets them.

With Mr Heathcliff, grim and saturnine, on the one hand, and Hareton, absolutely dumb, on the other, I made a somewhat cheerless meal, and bid adieu early. I would have departed by the back way, to get a last glimpse of Catherine and annoy old Joseph; but Hareton received orders to lead up my horse, and my host himself escorted me to the door, so I could not fulfil my wish.

`How dreary life gets over in that house!' l reflected, while riding down the road. `What a realization of something more romantic than a fairy tale it would have been for Mrs Linton Heathcliff, had she and I struck up an attachment, as her good nurse desired, and migrated together into the stirring atmosphere of the town!'



第三十一章02

“啊。“她回答,“我并不愿意限制他的成就:可是,他没有权利来把我的东西占为己有,而且用他那些讨厌的错误和不正确的读音使我觉得可笑!这些书,包括散文和诗,都由于一些别的联想,因此对于我是神圣不可侵犯的;我极不愿意这些书在他的口里被败坏亵渎!况且,他恰恰从所有的书中,选些我最爱背诵的几篇,好像是故意捣乱似的。“

哈里顿的胸膛默默地起伏了一下:他是在一种严重的屈辱与愤怒的感觉下苦斗,要压制下去是不容易的事。我站起来,出于一种想解除他的困窘的高尚念头,便站在门口,浏览外面的风景。他随着我的榜样,也离开了这间屋子;但是马上又出现了,手中捧着半打的书,他将它们扔到凯瑟琳的怀里,叫着:“拿去!我永远再不要听,不要念,也再不要想到它们啦!“

“我现在也不要了,“她回答。“我看见这些书就会联想到你,我就恨它们。“

她打开一本显然常常被翻阅的书,用一个初学者的拖长的声调念了一段,然后大笑,把书丢开。“听着。“她挑衅地说,开始用同样的腔调念一节古歌谣。

但是他的自爱使他不会再忍受更多的折磨了。我听见了,而且也不是完全不赞成,一种用手来制止她那傲慢的舌头的方法。这个小坏蛋尽力去伤害她表哥的感情,这感情虽然未经陶冶,却很敏感,体罚是他唯一向加害者清算和报复的方法。哈里顿随后就把这些书收集起来全扔到火里。我从他脸上看出来是怎样的痛苦心情,才能使他在愤怒中献上这个祭品。我猜想,在这些书焚化时,他回味着它们所给过他的欢乐,以及他从这些书中预感到一种得胜的和无止尽的欢乐的感觉。我想我也猜到了是什么在鼓励他秘密研读。他原是满足于日常劳作与粗野的牲口一样的享受的,直到凯瑟琳来到他的生活道路上才改变。因她的轻蔑而感到的羞耻,又希望得到她的赞许,这就是他力求上进的最初动机了,而他那上进的努力,既不能保护他避开轻蔑,也不能使他得到赞许,却产生了恰恰相反的结果。

“是的,那就是像你这样的一个畜生,从那些书里所能得到的一切益处!“凯瑟琳叫着,吮着她那受伤的嘴唇,用愤怒的眼睛瞅着这场火灾。

“现在你最好住嘴吧!“他凶猛地回答。

他的激动使他说不下去了。他急忙走到大门口,我让开路让他走过去。但是在他迈过门阶之前,希刺克厉夫先生走上砌道正碰见他,便抓着他的肩膀问:“这会儿干吗去,我的孩子?“

“没什么,没什么,“他说,便挣脱身子,独自去咀嚼他的悲哀和愤怒了。

希刺克厉夫在他背后凝视着他,叹了口气。

“要是我妨碍了我自己,那才古怪哩,“他咕噜着,不知道我在他背后,“但是当我在他的脸上寻找他父亲时,却一天天找到了她!见鬼!哈里顿怎么这样像她?我简直不能看他。“

他眼睛看着地面,郁郁不欢地走进去。他脸上有一种不安的、焦虑的表情,这是我以前从来没有看过的;他本人也望着消瘦些。他的儿媳妇,从窗里一看见他,马上就逃到厨房去了,所以只剩下我一个人。

“我很高兴看见你又出门了,洛克乌德先生,“他说,回答我的招呼。“一部分是出于自私的动机:我不以为我能弥补你在这荒凉地方的损失。我不止一次地纳闷奇怪,是什么缘故让你到这儿来的。“

“恐怕是一种无聊的奇想,先生,“这是我的回答,“不然就是一种无聊的奇想又要诱使我走开。下星期我要到伦敦去,我必须预先通知你,我在我约定的租期十二个月以后,无意再保留画眉田庄了。我相信我不会再在那儿住下去了。“

“啊,真的;你已经不乐意流放在尘世之外了,是吧?“他说。“可是如果你来是请求停付你所不再住的地方的租金的话,你这趟旅行是自费的:我在催讨任何人该付给我的费用的时候是从来不讲情面的。“

“我来不是请求停付什么的,“我叫起来,大为恼火了。

“如果你愿意的话我现在就跟你算,“我从口袋中取出记事簿。

“不,不,“他冷淡地回答,“如果你回不来,你要留下足够的钱来补偿你欠下的债。我不忙。坐下来,跟我们一块吃午饭吧;一个保险不再来访的客人经常是被欢迎的。凯瑟琳!开饭来,你在哪儿?“

凯琴琳又出现了,端着一盘刀叉。

你可以跟约瑟夫一块吃饭,“希刺克厉夫暗地小声说,“在厨房待着,等他走了再出来。“

她很敏捷地服从他的指示:也许她没有想违法犯规的心思。生活在蠢人和厌世者中间,她即使遇见较好的一类人,大概也不能欣赏了。

在我的一边坐的是希刺克厉夫先生,冷酷而阴沉,另一边是哈里顿,一声也不吭,我吃了一顿多少有点不愉快的饭,就早早的辞去了。我本想从后门走,以便最后看凯瑟琳一眼,还可以惹惹那老约瑟夫;可是哈里顿奉命牵了我的马来,而我的主人自己陪我到门口,因此我未能如愿。

“这家人的生活多闷人哪!“我骑着马在大路上走的时候想着。“如果林惇·希刺克厉夫夫人和我恋爱起来,正如她的好保姆所期望的,而且一块搬到城里的热闹环境中去,那对于她将是实现了一种比神话还更浪漫的事情了!“