《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十三章02(中英对照)

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2011-5-24 10:01

《呼啸山庄》有声名著第三十三章02(中英对照)

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《呼啸山庄》是英国女作家勃朗特姐妹之一艾米莉·勃朗特的作品。小说描写吉卜赛弃儿希 斯克利夫被山庄老主人收养后,因受辱和恋爱不遂,外出致富,回来后对与其女友凯瑟琳结婚的地主林顿及其子女进行报复的故事。全篇充满强烈的反压迫、争幸福 的斗争精神,又始终笼罩着离奇、紧张的浪漫气氛。它开始曾被人看做是年青女作家脱离现实的天真幻想,但结合其所描写地区激烈的阶级斗争和英国的社会现象, 它不久便被评论界高度肯定,并受到读者的热烈欢迎。根据这部小说改编的影视作品至今久演不衰。

Chapter33-02

`When this slight disagreement was over, they were friends again, and as busy as possible in their several occupations of pupil and teacher. I came in to sit with them, after I had done my work; and I felt so soothed and comforted to watch them, that I did not notice how time got on. You know, they both appeared in a measure my children: I had long been proud of one; and now, I was sure, the other would be a source of equal satisfaction. His honest, warm, and intelligent nature shook off rapidly the clouds of ignorance and degradation in which it had been bred; and Catherine's sincere commendations acted as a spur to his industry. His brightening mind brightened his features, and added spirit and nobility to their aspect: I could hardly fancy it the same individual I had beheld on the day I discovered my little lady at `Wuthering Heights, after her expedition to the Crags. `While I admired and they laboured, dusk grew on, and with it returned the master. He came upon us quite unexpectedly, entering by the front way, and had a full view of the whole three, ere we could raise our heads to glance at him. Well, I reflected, there was never a pleasanter, or more harmless sight; and it will be a burning shame to scold them. The red firelight glowed on their two bonny heads, and revealed their faces animated with the eager interest of children; for,--though he was twenty-three and she eighteen, each had so much of novelty to feel and learn, that neither experienced nor evinced the sentiments of sober disenchanted maturity.

They lifted their eyes together, to encounter Mr Heathcliff: perhaps you have never remarked that their eyes are precisely similar, and they are those of Catherine Earnshaw. The present Catherine has no other likeness to her, except a breadth of forehead, and a certain arch of the nostril that makes her appear rather haughty, whether she will or not. `With Hareton the resemblance is carried further: it is singular at all times, then it was particularly striking; because his senses were alert, and his mental faculties wakened to unwonted activity. I suppose this resemblance disarmed Mr Heathcliff: he walked to the hearth in evident agitation; but it quickly subsided as he looked at the young man: or, I should say, altered its character; for it was there yet. He took the book from his hand, and glanced at the open page, then returned it without any observation; merely signing Catherine away: her companion lingered very little behind her, and I was about to depart also, but he bid me sit still.

`It is a poor conclusion, is it not?' he observed, having brooded a while on the scene he had just witnessed: `an absurd termination to my violent exertions? I get levers and mattocks to demolish the two houses, and train myself to be capable of working like Hercules, and when everything is ready and in my power, I find the will to lift a slate off either roof has vanished! My old enemies have not beaten me; now would be the precise time to revenge myself on their representatives: I could do it; and none could hinder me. But where is the use? I don't care for striking; I can't take the trouble to raise my hand! That sounds as if I had been labouring the whole time only to exhibit a fine trait of magnanimity. It is far from being the case: I have lost the faculty of enjoying their destruction, and I am too idle to destroy for nothing.

`Nelly, there is a strange change approaching: I'm in its shadow at present. I take so little interest in my daily life, that I hardly remember to eat and drink. Those two who have left the room are the only objects which retain a distinct material appearance to me; and that appearance causes me pain, amounting to agony. About her I won't speak; and I don't desire to think; but I earnestly wish she were invisible: her presence invokes only maddening sensations. He moves me differently: and yet if I could do it without seeming insane, I'd never see him again. You'll perhaps think me rather inclined to become so,' he added, making an effort to smile, `if I try to describe the thousand forms of past associations and ideas he awakens or embodies. But you'll not talk of what I tell you; and my mind is so eternally secluded in itself, it is tempting at last to turn it out to another.

`Five minutes ago, Hareton seemed a personification of my youth, not a human being: I felt to him in such a variety of ways, that it would have been impossible to have accosted him rationally. In the first place, his startling likeness to Catherine connected him fearfully with her. That, however, which you may suppose the most potent to arrest my imagination, is actually the least: for what is not connected with her to me? and what does not recall her? I cannot look down to this floor, but her features are shaped in the flags! In every cloud, in every tree--filling the air at night, and caught by glimpses in every object by day--I am surrounded with her image! The most ordinary faces of men and women--my own features--mock me with a resemblance. The entire world is a dreadful collection of memoranda that she did exist, and that I have lost her! Well, Hareton's aspect was the ghost of my immortal love; of my wild endeavours to hold my right; my degradation, my pride, my happiness, and my anguish:

`But it is frenzy to repeat these thoughts to you: only it will let you know why, with a reluctance to be always alone, his society is no benefit; rather an aggravation of the constant torment I suffer; and it partly contributes to render me regardless how he and his cousin go on together. I can give them no attention, any more.

`But what do you mean by a change, Mr Heathcliff?' I said, alarmed at his manner: though he was neither in danger of losing his senses, nor dying, according to my judgment; he was quite strong and healthy: and, as to his reason, from childhood he had a delight in dwelling on dark things, and entertaining odd fancies. He might have had a monomania on the subject of his departed idol; but on every other point his wits were as sound as mine.

`I shall not know that till it comes,' he said, `I'm only half conscious of it now.

`You have no feelings of illness, have you?' I asked.

`No, Nelly, I have not,' he answered.

`Then you are not afraid of death?' I pursued.

`Afraid? No!' he replied. `I have neither a fear, nor a presentiment, nor a hope of death. Why should I? `With my hard constitution and temperate mode of living, and unperilous occupations, I ought to, and probably shall, remain above ground till there is scarcely a black hair on my head. And yet I cannot continue in this condition! I have to remind myself to breathe--almost to remind my heart to beat! And it is like bending back a stiff spring; it is by compulsion that I do the slightest act not prompted by one thought; and by compulsion that I notice anything alive or dead, which is not associated with one universal idea. I have a single wish, and my whole being and faculties are yearning to attain It. They have yearned towards it so long, and so unwaveringly, that I'm convinced it will be reached--and soon--because it has devoured my existence: I am swallowed up in the anticipation of its fulfilment. My confessions have not relieved me; but they may account for some otherwise unaccountable phases of humour which I show. O God! It is a long fight, I wish it were over!'

He began to pace the room, muttering terrible things to himself, till I was inclined to believe, as he said Joseph did, that conscience had turned his heart to an earthly hell. I wondered greatly how it would end. Though he seldom before had revealed this state of mind, even by looks, it was his habitual mood, I had no doubt: he asserted it himself; but not a soul, from his general bearing, would have conjectured the fact. You did not when you saw him, Mr Lockwood: and at the period of which I speak he was just the same as then; only fonder of continued solitude, and perhaps still more laconic in company.



第三十三章02

这场轻微的不和过去后,他们又亲密起来,并且在他们又是学生又是老师的各种工作上忙得不可开交。等我作完我的事,进去和他们坐在一起;我望着他们,觉得定心和安慰,而使我竟然没有注意时间是怎么过去的。你知道,他们俩多少有几分都像是我的孩子:我对于其中的一个早就很得意;而现在,我敢说,另一个也会使我同样满意的。他那诚实的、温和的、懂事的天性很快地摆脱了自小沾染的愚昧与堕落的困境;凯瑟琳的真挚的称赞对于他的勤勉成为一种鼓舞。他头脑中思想开朗也使他的面貌添了光彩,在神色上加上了气魄和高贵,我都难以想像这个人就是在凯瑟琳到山岩探险以后,我发现我的小姐已到了呼啸山庄的那天所见到的那同一个人。在我赞赏着他们,他们还在用功的当儿,暮色渐深了,主人随着也回来了。他相当出乎我们意料地来到我们跟前,是从前门进来的,我们还没来得及抬头望他,他已经完全看到我们三个人了。嗯,我想没有比当时的情景更为愉快,或者是更为无害的了;要责骂他们将是一个奇耻大辱,红红的炉火照在他们两人的漂亮的头上,显出他们那由于孩子气的热烈兴趣而朝气蓬勃的脸。因为,虽然他二十三岁,她十八岁,但他们都还有很多新鲜事物要去感受与学习,两人都没有体验过或是表示过冷静清醒的成熟情感。

他们一起抬起眼睛望望希刺克厉夫先生。也许你从来没有注意过他们的眼睛十分相像,都是凯瑟琳·恩萧的眼睛。现在的凯瑟琳没有别的地方像她,除了宽额和有点拱起的翘鼻子,这使她显得简直有点高傲,不管她本心是不是要这样。至于哈里顿,那份模样就更进一步相似:这在任何时候都是显著的,这时更特别显著;因为他的感觉正锐敏,他的智力正在觉醒到非常活跃的地步。我猜想这种相像使希刺克厉夫缓和了:他显然很激动地走到炉边;但是在他望望那年轻人时,那激动很快地消失了:或者,我可以说,它变了性质,因为那份激动还是存在的。他从哈里顿的手中拿起那本书,瞅瞅那打开的一页,然后没说一句话就还给他,只做手势叫凯瑟琳走开。她的伴侣在她走后也没有待多久;我也正要走开,但是他叫我仍然坐着别动。

“这是一个很糟糕的结局,是不是?“他对他刚刚目睹的情景沉思了一刻之后说:“对于我所作的那些残暴行为,这不是一个滑稽的结局吗?我用撬杆和锄头来毁灭这两所房子,并且把我自己训练得能像赫库里斯一样的工作,等到一切都准备好,并且是在我权力之中了,我却发现掀起任何一所房子的一片瓦的意志都已经消失了!我旧日的敌人并不曾打败我;现在正是我向他们的代表人报仇的时候:我可以这样作;没有人能阻拦我。可是有什么用呢?我不想打人;我连抬手都嫌麻烦!好像是我苦了一辈子只是要显一下宽宏大量似的。不是这么回事:我已经失掉了欣赏他们毁灭的能力,而我太懒得去做无谓的破坏了。

“耐莉,有一个奇异的变化临近了;目前我正在它的阴影里。我对我的日常生活如此不感兴趣,以至于我都不大记得吃喝的事。刚刚出这间屋子的那两个人,对我来说,是唯一的还保留着清晰的实质形象的东西;那形象使我痛苦,甚至伤心。关于她我不想说什么;我也不愿想,可是我热切地希望她不露面。她的存在只能引起使人发疯的感觉。他给我的感受就不同了;可是如果我能作得不像是有精神病的样子,我就情愿永远不再见他!如果我试试描绘他所唤醒的或是体现的千百种过去的联想和想法,你也许以为我简直有精神失常的倾向吧,“他又说,勉强微笑着,“但是我所告诉你的,你不要说出去:我的心一直是这样的隐蔽着,到末了它却不得不向另外一个人敞开来。

“五分钟以前,哈里顿仿佛是我的青春的一个化身,而不是一个人,他给我许多各种各样的感觉,以至于不可能理性地对待他。

“首先,他和凯瑟琳的惊人的相像竟使他和她联在一起了。你也许以为那最足以引起我的想像力的一点,实际上却是最不足道的;因为对于我来说,哪一样不是和她有联系的呢?哪一样不使我回忆起她来呢:我一低头看这间屋里的地面,就不能不看见她的面貌在石板中间出现!在每一朵云里,每一棵树上——在夜里充满在空中,在白天从每一件东西上都看得见——我是被她的形象围绕着!最平常的男人和女人的脸——连我自己的脸——都像她,都在嘲笑我。整个世界成了一个惊人的纪念品汇集,处处提醒着我她是存在过,而我已失去了她!

“是的,哈里顿的模样是我那不朽的爱情的幻影;也是我想保持我的权力的那些疯狂的努力,我的堕落,我的骄傲,我的幸福,以及我的悲痛的幻影——

“但把这些想法反复说给你听也是发疯:不过这会让你知道为什么,我并不情愿永远孤独,有他陪伴却又毫无益处:简直加重了我所忍受的不断的折磨:这也多少使我不管他和他的表妹以后怎么相处。我不能再注意他们了。“

“可是你所谓的一个变化是什么呢,希刺克厉夫先生?“我说,他的态度把我吓着了;虽然他并不像有精神错乱的危险,也不会死。据我判断,他挺健壮;至于他的理性,从童年起他就喜欢思索一些不可思议的事,尽是古怪的幻想。他也许对他那死去的偶像有点偏执狂;可是在其他方面,他的头脑是跟我一样地健全的。

“在它来到之前,我也不会知道,“他说,“现在我只是隐约地意识到而已。“

“你没有感到生病吧,你病了吗?“我问。

“没有,耐莉,我没有病,“他回答。

“那么你不是怕死吧?“我又追问。

“怕死?不!“他回答。“我对死没有恐惧,也没有预感,也没有巴望着死。我为什么要有呢?有我这结实的体格,有节制的生活方式,和不冒险的工作,我应该,大概也会,留在地面上直等到我头上找不出一根黑发来。可我不能让这种情况继续下去!我得提醒我自己要呼吸——几乎都要提醒我的心跳动!这就是像把一根硬弹簧扳弯似的;只要不是由那个思想指点的行动,即使是最微不足道的行动,也是被迫而作出来的;对于任何活的或死的东西,只要不是和那一个无所不在的思想有联系,我也是被迫而注意的。我只有一个愿望,我整个的身心和能力都渴望着达到那个愿望,渴望了这么久,这么不动摇,以至于我都确信必然可以达到——而且不久——因为这愿望已经毁了我的生存:我已经在那即将实现的预感中消耗殆尽了。我的自白并不能使我轻松;可是这些话可以说明我所表现的情绪,不如此是无法说明的。啊,上帝!这是一个漫长的搏斗;我希望它快过去吧!“

他开始在屋里走来走去,自己咕噜着一些可怕的话,这使我渐渐相信(他说约瑟夫也相信),良心使他的心变成人间地狱。我非常奇怪这将如何结束。虽然他以前很少显露出这种心境,甚至神色上也不露出来,但他平常的心情一定就是这样,我是不存怀疑的。他自己也承认了;但是从他一般的外表上看来,没有一个人会猜测到这事实。洛克乌德先生,当你初见他时,你也没想到,就在我说到的这个时期,他也还是和从前一样,只是更喜欢孤寂些,也许在人前话更少些而已。